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Can Study – The first Two Stages of Microtia Ear Reconstruction

  Background: The ear has a complex shape which is exposed to a variety of congenital deformities. The most severe congenital ear deformity is that of microtia in which the ear is either severely deformed or even largely missing. In most cases remnants of the ear are present but it is significantly misshapen and shrunken Read More…

Case Study – Skin Graft Reconstruction of Type 1 Cryptotia

  Background:  Cryptotia is a well known congenital ear deformity whose appearance is marked by loss (disasppearance) of the upper part of the ear. The upper pole of the ear is buried under the temporal skin to varying degrees. While the ear can be pulled out from underneath the skin it will return to its Read More…

Case Study – Prosthetic Ear Reconstruction with Endosseous Implants

  Background:  Traumatic loss of part or all of one’s ear at any age poses a difficult reconstructive challenge. In some cases the use of autologous grafts (rib grafts and flaps) can be done. While effective this places an additional vertical scar in the temporal region for flap harvest. This may also be more additional Read More…

Case Study – Ear Reconstruction with Skin Flap and Rolled ePTFE

  Background: As a projecting structure from the side of the head with a funnel-like and flexible attachment, the ear can withstand a wide variety of deforming forces. Its very flexibility protects it from injury when exposed to shearing forces. Like a palm tree in high winds its ability to bend is a protective mechanism. Read More…

Case Study – Reconstruction of the Burned Ear

  Background: As a projecting facial structure the ear is exposed to a variety of traumatic insults. One such type of traumatic ear injury is that of burns. Most commonly occurring in house and other entrapped fire situations, the sustained exposure  to high heat often causes a melted ear appearance. The anterior exposed ear surface Read More…

OR Snapshots – ePTFE Implant Framework in Ear Reconstruction

  Reconstruction of the lost ear requires a two-layer approach. The base la\yer is the firm and shaped framework which replaces the missing natural cartilage. The choices for the framework are either rib cartilage or synthetic framework.  The second layer is the need for vascularized tissue coverage which, in cases of large amounts of ear Read More…

Case Study – Osseointegrafted Implant Prosthetic Ear Reconstruction

  Background: Loss of an ear can occur from a variety of reasons including cancer resection and traumatic avulsion. Such ear amputations pose major reconstructive challenges which can be done using an autogenous method (cartilage framework and vascularized soft tissue cover), completely prosthetic method (ear prosthesis) or a combination of both autogenous tissue and prosthesis. Read More…

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